Basic Intervention Facts

Basic Intervention Facts

"In order for the intervention to be successful, all the logistical barriers to treatment must be addressed."

Because families often come together and experience each other in more intense ways during holidays a drinking or drug problem can sometimes become more apparent at this time of year. If you're thinking of conducting an intervention for a family member or friend who has an alcohol or drug problem, it's important to speak with a professional interventionist who can access the situation and help you conduct the intervention if it is deemed appropriate.You will need to consider if everyone who is currently enabling the alcoholic is convinced that the intervention is needed, and everyone will need to be—to some extent at least-- bought into the intervention process. It's natural for some family members, for example, to be more firmly entrenched in denial than others. Not everyone has to feel the same level of urgency in order to make the intervention stick, but everyone involved has to be willing to put some consequences in place if the addict doesn't seek treatment and accept that their relationship with the addict will change regardless of whether the intervention is successful. It's also important (and this is often missed in the reality tv version of this process) is that even if the intervention is successful, sometimes the addict will still experience resentment towards the family members and friends that staged the intervention.

In order for the intervention to be successful, all the logistical barriers to treatment must be addressed. An addict who is resistant to the idea of treatment is going to use an excuse (“who will take care of my dog”) to postpone treatment without incurring the consequences threatened in the intervention. If you have provisions made for pet care, child care, financial obligations as well as all the travel arrangements to the treatment center made,  its simplifies the negotiation process with the addict.